Appendix: Sample Collection

Document Samples

The following samples are also found embedded in the relevant portions of the textbook. The figure numbers below each sample correspond to where the figure can be found in the original text. They are collected here for convenience. Please see Appendix: Using Sample Documents Effectively for helpful considerations to keep in mind when consulting samples such as these. Please see the original chapter (linked in column 4) for full attributions and source information.

Sample Type (Alphabetical Order) Thumbnail (Click to Enlarge) Accessible PDF, Page with Screen-readable Text, or Page with Image with Alt-Text Link to Chapter for Context
Agenda
Follow the link in the column to the right to see the chapter page with the screen-readable version
Figure 13.1
Chapter 13: Collaborative Writing, “Documents and Tools to Improve Team Effectiveness” Chapter 13: Collaborative Writing, “Documents and Tools to Improve Team Effectiveness”
Decision Matrix
See the link in the right column to proceed to the chapter page with the accessible table.
Table 20.3
Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports, “Decision-Making and Criteria” Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports, “Decision-Making and Criteria”
Decision Tree
Decision tree titled: "Should you hire a professional for a household project or do it yourself?" Branches asking questions about various project characteristics are followed by yes/no, leading down to three options: "do it yourself," "wait to complete the project," or "hire a professional." Examples of the questions in the branches include: "Do you have access to the tools needed?" "Is the cost of materials significantly less than the cost of hiring a professional?" and "Do you understand how to complete the task?"
Figure 20.12
Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports, “Decision-Making and Criteria” Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports, “Decision-Making and Criteria”
Email
This image shows a generic email as it typically appears on a screen. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 15.1. Sample email.
Figure 15.1 Chapter 15: Correspondence, “Email”
Gantt Chart (Complex)
This figure shows a detailed example of a Gantt chart developed in project-management software. In these charts, tasks appear in the left column with dates across the top row. Using the date/task coordinates, project managers then shade in the cells in each task row that correspond to the dates in the top row, and to the time frame when that task will be carried out. The different tasks can also be color-coded to help differentiate them.
Figure 18.2. Illustration of a more complex Gantt chart.
Chapter 18: Proposals, “Designing and Formatting Proposals” Chapter 18: Proposals, “Designing and Formatting Proposals”
Gantt Chart (Simple)
This image shows an example of a simple Gantt chart, made using a table with filled in cells. For a screen-readable version, please see the accessible PDF in the caption.
Figure 18.1. Simple Example of a Gantt Chart
Figure 18.1 Chapter 18: Proposals, “Designing and Formatting Proposals”
Instructions Page one (see PDF in next column for complete instructions):

[Part 1 of 8] This and all of the remaining images in this chapter comprise a sample set of instructions. Please click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of these instructions. You will note that each image within the PDF has its own alt-text. This is the practice you should use when designing your own technical documents.

Figure 17.1 Chapter 17: Instructions, “Illustrating Your Instructions”
Letter (Cover for Application)
This image shows an example of a cover letter as it should appear on the page. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 16.5. Cover letter template.
Figure 16.5 Chapter 16: Applications, “Cover Letters”
Letter (Cover for Application) Parts
This image shows and explains the main parts of the content of a cover letter. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 16.6. Parts of a cover letter.
Figure 16.6 Chapter 16: Applications, “Cover Letters”
Letter (Cover for Report)
This image shows the layout of a typical letter as it appears on the page, with labels pointing out what each part is, where it goes, and what it should contain. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 15.2. Sample cover letter.
Figure 15.2 Chapter 15: Correspondence, “Letters”
Letter (Transmittal – Template)
This image shows how the parts of a letter of transmittal might look on the page. See the accessible PDF in the column to the right for the text.
Figure 20.1. Template for letter of transmittal.
Figure 20.1 Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports: “Front Matter”
Letter (Transmittal) Example
An example of how a letter of transmittal might appear on the page. See the accessible PDF in the column to the right for more details and content.
Figure 20.2. An example of a letter of transmittal.
Figure 20.2 Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports: “Front Matter”
List of Figures
This image shows how a list of figures looks on the page. See the accessible PDF in the column to the right for contents.
Figure 20.5. List of Figures.
Figure 20.5 Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports: “Front Matter”
List of Tables
This image shows how a list of tables looks on the page. See the accessible PDF in the column to the right for contents.
Figure 20.6. List of tables.
Figure 20.6 Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports: “Front Matter”
Meeting Minutes
Follow the link in the column to the right to see the chapter page with the screen-readable version
Figure 13.2
Chapter 13: Collaborative Writing, “Documents and Tools to Improve Team Effectiveness” Chapter 13: Collaborative Writing, “Documents and Tools to Improve Team Effectiveness”
Memo (Memorandum)
This image shows the layout of a typical memorandum as it should appear on the page or screen. The header (to, from, subject, date) are shown, as well as the major sections of the document, such as the Summary, Discussion and Recommendation. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 15.3. An example of a memo with explanatory content.
Figure 15.3 Chapter 15: Correspondence, “Memorandums”
Outline (2-Level)
Screenreadable Text Found in Chapter 9, "Outlining"
Figure 9.2
Chapter 9: The Writing Process, “Outlining” Chapter 9: The Writing Process, “Outlining”
Outline (3-Level)
See Chapter with Screenreadable Version
Figure 9.3
Chapter 9: The Writing Process, “Outlining” Chapter 9: The Writing Process, “Outlining”
Proposal
This image shows how a memo proposal should appear on the page, with an email-style heading at the top and the different body sections indicated using clear headings and white space. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 18.3. 210 proposal template.
Figure 18.3 Chapter 18: Proposals, “Proposals in ENGL 210”
Recommendation Report (ENGL 210 Parts)
This image shows the parts of a recommendation report laid out on the page. See the accessible PDF in the column to the right for content.
Figure 20.13. Template for ENGL 210 Recommendation Report.
Figure 20.13 Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports, “Crafting Recommendation and Feasibility Reports: What to Remember”
Recommendation Report Body (Introduction)
This images shows the main sections usually contained in the introduction to a recommendation report. See the accessible PDF in the column to the right for contents.
Figure 20.6. Introduction to a recommendation report template.
Figure 20.7 Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports, “Introduction”
References (APA)
This images shows how the beginning of an APA references list appears on the page. See the accessible PDF from the column on the right for the contents.
Figure 20.11. APA references template.
Figure 20.11 Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports, “References”
Résumé (Chronological)
This image shows an example of a chronological resume as it should appear on the page. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 16.1. Example of the chronological résumé format.
Figure 16.1 Chapter 16: Applications, “Resumes”
Résumé (Hybrid)
This image shows an example of a hybrid resume as it should appear on the page. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 16.3. Example of the hybrid résumé format.
Figure 16.3 Chapter 16: Applications, “Resumes”
Résumé Parts
This image shows an example of a resume with the standard categories (education, skills, experience) clearly labelled. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 16.4. Sample of résumé parts.
Figure 16.4 Chapter 16: Applications, “Resumes”
Résumé (Skills)
This image shows an example of a skills resume as it should appear on the page. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 16.2. Example of the skills résumé format.
Figure 16.2 Chapter 16: Applications, “Resumes”
Table of Contents
This shows how the table of contents appears on the page. See the accessible PDF in the column on the right for contents.
Figure 20.4. Example Table of Contents.
Figure 20.4 Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports: “Front Matter”
Task Schedule
Follow the link in the column to the right to see the chapter page with the screen-readable version
Table 13.4
Chapter 13: Collaborative Writing, “Documents and Tools to Improve Team Effectiveness” Chapter 13: Collaborative Writing, “Documents and Tools to Improve Team Effectiveness”
Thank You Letter (for Interview)
This image shows a typical thank-you letter as it should appear on the page. Click the link at the end of the caption for an accessible PDF of this information.
Figure 16.7. Interview thank-you letter sample.
Figure 16.7 Chapter 16: Applications, “Thank You Letters”
Title Page of Report
This image shows how a title page would appear laid out on the page. See the accessible PDF in the column to the right for content.
Figure 20.3. Example of a report title page.
Figure 20.3 Chapter 20: Recommendation Reports: “Front Matter”
Work Log
Follow the link in the column to the right to see the chapter page with the screen-readable version
Figure 13.3
Chapter 13: Collaborative Writing, “Documents and Tools to Improve Team Effectiveness” Chapter 13: Collaborative Writing, “Documents and Tools to Improve Team Effectiveness”

 

McKinney, Matt, Kalani Pattison, Sarah LeMire, Kathy Anders, and Nicole Hagstrom-Schmidt, eds. Howdy or Hello?: Technical and Professional Communication. College Station: Texas A&M University, 2020. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

Other samples derived from:

Swarts, Jason, Stacey Pigg, Jamie Larsen, Julia Helo Gonzalez, Rebecca De Haas, and Elizabeth Wagner. Communication in the Workplace: What Can NC State Students Expect? North Carolina State University Professional Writing Program, 2018. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1pMpVbDRWIN6HssQQQ4MeQ6U-oB-sGUrtRswD7feuRB0/edit#heading=h.n2a3udms5sd5. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Savage, Megan, “Resume Sections and Guidelines” and “Resume Formats,” licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License in: Gross, Allison, Annemarie Hamlin, Billy Merck, Chris Rubio, Jodi Naas, Megan Savage, and Michele DeSilva. Technical Writing. Open Oregon Educational Materials, n.d. https://openoregon.pressbooks.pub/technicalwriting/. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Gross, Allison, Annemarie Hamlin, Billy Merck, Chris Rubio, Jodi Naas, Megan Savage, and Michele DeSilva. Technical Writing. Open Oregon Educational Materials, n.d. https://openoregon.pressbooks.pub/technicalwriting/. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

The above authors derived their text from:

Saylor Academy. “PRDV002: Professional Writing.” April 2016. Online Course. https://learn.saylor.org/course/view.php?id=56. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

McMurrey, David. Online Technical Writing. n.d. https://www.prismnet.com/~hcexres/textbook/. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

McKinney, Matt, Kalani Pattison, Sarah LeMire, Kathy Anders, and Nicole Hagstrom-Schmidt, eds. Howdy or Hello?: Technical and Professional Communication. College Station: Texas A&M University, 2020. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

 

License

Icon for the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Howdy or Hello? Technical and Professional Communication by Matt McKinney, Kalani Pattison, Sarah LeMire, Kathy Anders, and Nicole Hagstrom-Schmidt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

Share This Book